this-week’s-new-tracks:-aziya,-jessie-ware,-wh-lung

This week’s new tracks: Aziya, Jessie Ware, WH Lung

Aziya

Blood

Songs that actually thrive on a automotive stereo are few and much between, however what Aziya has carried out with this skyscraping refrain is assured to make you wish to roll down your home windows, crack open the sunroof and begin smacking the steering wheel in time with the beat. In the event you don’t have a automotive, simply steal one. Whoever pulls you over is certain to know. (Notice: don’t steal a automotive – Ed)

Jessie Ware

Scorching N Heavy

Having perfected a voice-to-breath ratio that hits like a delightful breeze, Jessie Ware’s newest doesn’t stray removed from the method that made What’s Your Pleasure? the darling of so many 2020 album of the yr lists. Whereas Scorching N Heavy could not precisely replicate a balmy summer time sundown on the balcony of a Balearic villa, it’s as shut as we are able to hope for given present journey tips.

WH Lung

Pearl within the Palm

Would anybody of their proper thoughts ever pose the query: “What would it not sound like if LCD Soundsystem had written Funkytown?” No. Ought to we be glad that – whether or not by chance or design – WH Lung have by some means stumbled throughout the reply? Sure. And if the driving, hypnotic construct of Pearl within the Palm is something to go by, their upcoming album, Vanities, will probably be a peach, too.

Bullet for My Valentine

Knives

If summertime singles are a bit of gentle to your tastes, Bullet for My Valentine are again with a sonic onslaught; a masterclass in exhibiting simply how a lot noise 4 blokes could make once they get their shoulders behind it and shove. There isn’t a scarcity of concepts crammed into Knives, both: gymnastic guitar riffs, snarling vocals and extra drum hits in 4 minutes than throughout most albums.

Billen Ted ft Mae Muller

When You’re Out

The manufacturing group that helped TikTok star Nathan Evans flip a Nineteenth-century sea shanty right into a Twenty first-century chart-topper, Billen Ted are actually working the same grift on a Kisstory basic – Kandi’s Don’t Suppose I’m Not – lifting the refrain wholesale and slapping on the kind of ubiquitous pop bassline that sounds as if it’s being thwacked out on plastic gasoline pipes with a ping-pong paddle.

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